best fish for eating snails - The Planted Tank Forum

Most fish will eat snails. The problem is, except for a few mentioned above, they can’t manage the shells. But, if you help out a little by removing the snail from the shell, your fish ought to gobble it up. You do this by crushing the shell with your fingers or some other device. Some aquarists use a pluck-and-squish method, where they grab snails directly off the glass with their (clean) hands, crush them with their fingers and drop them right back in the tank.

whats the best fish that will eat snails but not attack other fish?

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The biggest downer for me is the destruction on the leaves of my beloved red tiger lotus, they will come back but snails really did a number on them. The lights were left on in my tanks for probably 4 days and I had a little green water, not a biggie as once i got them on the right schedule and a big water change,all is good. Get loaches that aren't aggressive to eat your snails if they bother the plants

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small snail eating freshwater fish - The Planted Tank Forum

hi, i'm looking for the best snail eating fish for my tank With the rise in popularity of tropical planted aquariums, people are also beginning to look for new solutions to aid in snail prevention and eradication. Since many of the snail killing products on the market today contain copper, they are not a wise choice to use in planted aquariums because of the sensitivity of those plants to copper. That leaves aquarists with two choices : mechanical or biological snail control. Mechanical control consists of trapping the snails with a jar that contains a leaf of lettuce. The jar is placed in the tank at night and removed in the morning. Another mechanical solution is physically removing the individual snails by hand. One can see that neither of these methods offer complete control. Biological control involves using snail eating fish to remove the snails from your tank. This is often the best and most efficient way to remove snails in any tank.

i have a 10g with live plants and 5 small community fish

While many people look to the clown loach ( Chromobotia macracanthus) to help rid their tanks of pesky snail populations, there are several small species of Botia that are perhaps a better, smarter solution for tanks under 150 gallons. Botia striata is one of these species. While the clown loach reaches a size of nearly 40 cm (16 in.) the modest only attains a size of around 10cm (4in.) A curious and attractive addition to your tank, the zebra loach has the typical torpedo – shaped body of most botia. They are yellow in color with diagonal black striations. The zebra loach hails from clear mountain streams in India, where it lives in shoals of several individuals and feeds on crustaceans, insect larvae, worms, and soft plant material. Botia striata are relatively undemanding fish to keep in a home aquarium. Although they prefer softer water, they tolerate a wide range of pH vaues (6.5 to 8.0) and can also tolerate temperatures from 75 F to 82 F, so long as the temperature is stable. Like most botia, the zebra loach does benefit from higher oxygen levels in the water. Performing small weekly water changes of 10% to 20% and placing an in the aquarium will provide plenty of oxygen. Weekly water changes will also keep your dissolved organic levels down to a minimum. This will be appreciated greatly by all residents of the aquarium, especially any botia or loach.

Aquarium Snails: What To Keep And What To Avoid - Petcha