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hello im from Alberta canada and i bought 4 red tailed sharks for my 30g fish aquarium. i put them in there to start off a brand new tank and expected thwm to die from not fully cycling my tank. however the 4 survived and never showed a sign of stress or even fighting. tho a 3 week period went by with no water change and i decided to put 3 guppies in there because i thought the sharks whould eat them. but after i put the guppies in, 2 of my sharks are latxhing onto eachother and swimming around eachother constantly for hours at a time. my other 2 actually started fighting and now those 2 lay alone in a corner. now those 2 that were “mating” 1 of thwm now has a verry swollen belly and doesent eat, hudes in the slate rock home and i wont see her for 2 days at a time.

Saltwater Fish Tank, Blacktip Shark Aquarium for Home - Duration: 0:55

Sharks are known to be very dangerous to humans and most of all to other aquatic animals. But a lot of people have seen how beautiful sharks are. Some fish enthusiasts even keep them inside a fish tank. Pretty cool yet you need to be careful with your choice of tanks as well as the water condition for such kind of fish. When you plan to house a shark in your home, you need to know many things to be able to successfully keep them well.

Aquarium Sharks and Shark Fish Owners Guide

0:36 · Best Sharks for a Home Fish Tank | Aquarium Care - Duration: 2:42 Watch more How to Take Care of an Aquarium videos:



When deciding on what shark to get, you want the best shark for your fish take. It first depends if you have a freshwater tank or a saltwater tank. The sharks that you'll find for freshwater tanks are not true sharks. They're not cartilaginous. They're bony fishes. Their fin patterns and their morphology closely resemble saltwater sharks, so for that reason they're called sharks, but they're not true sharks.

Saltwater is where you'd find the real sharks. For freshwater, most of the shark get very, very large. The iridescent sharks, tricolor sharks, they get really, really big, I mean, three to four feet in nature, but they happen to be very hardy. So you can keep them in a small aquarium, maybe 30 to 50 gallons in size. But they're going to quickly outgrow it, and it's cruel to keep a fish that gets three or four feet in nature restricted to a tank that's only three or four feet long. It's just really, really cruel, so I don't recommend a lot of the freshwater fish that are called sharks for home aquariums. If you have to have a freshwater fish that's called a shark, you can get a redtail shark. They don't get as big. The flying foxes kind of look like sharks. They don't get terribly large.

But for saltwater, the sharks that I would recommend are any of the cat sharks, bamboo, banded cats, dog chain. Those sharks stay on the bottom. Even the epaulettes from Australia, those are really cute sharks. They walk around on their pectoral fins. They also get large, so you want to make sure you have a large aquarium, but because they're not pelagic swimmers like black tips and white tips, any of the open swimming sharks, they're more suitable to home aquariums.

If you have to have something that looks like a great white or a baby great white, like a black tip, you're going to need a really large tank, and those tanks are very expensive. I'm talking, people would recommend a 200 to 300 gallon tank. I wouldn't put them in anything less than 1000 gallons. That tank needs to be round in shape. It needs to be eight to ten feet in diameter. They're just not going to fare well in anything smaller. And the upkeep and the maintenance on an aquarium like that is pretty staggering. You really have to know what you're doing. You need to have a lot of money or be really into this hobby to be that dedicated to keep one these open water reef sharks.

So to wrap it up, for saltwater, I would recommend one of the bottom-dwelling cat sharks. Nurse sharks are really good when they're small, but they get really large, so I don't feel that they're suitable for captivity. And then for freshwater, redtail sharks, tri-colors or balas sharks or iridescent sharks are great when they're small. But again, they're going to get really large and you're going to have to get them a much bigger tank, like the 200 to 300 gallon tank to keep them when they're adults.

Aquarium Shark and Shark Fish must be kept in larger aquariums

What do I need to bring my shark fish home? (Simple travel tips for your shark fish after you purchase it in order to safely bring it home and the right way to add it to your tank to reduce stress on the fish are inside the book.)

Freshwater Sharks for Sale: Freshwater Aquarium Shark Species