Buying Aquariums for Your Home | Washingtonian

The primary residence for Claudia and her husband, Bob, is in Long Grove, Il., where they run a successful recycling business. They have three adult children – Chrissy, Brittney and Bobby – and a granddaughter, 13-month-old Ella, who already has the word “fish” in her vocabulary. Their second home, from which they can watch Disney fireworks nightly, includes a boat dock; an infinity-edge custom pool in the backyard; a wall-of- water fountain in the foyer; and colorful glass bubbles dangling playfully in the great room. At the center of it all is the aquarium, framed by maple cabinetry with crown molding.

No Room For An Aquarium? 20 Unusual Places In Your Home For Fish Tanks. I love aquariums but I can never seem to keep fish alive.

A can be a great addition to any room that could use a little exotic flair, no matter what size. Obviously, the bigger the tank, the more of an impact it’s going to make on the room. You can get massive furniture pieces specifically designed for tanks that hold tens or hundreds of gallons of water, which are certainly necessary, but are big and bulky and often end up taking up a lot of space. Instead, why not work your aquarium design into your furniture or architecture of your home? Here are a few breathtaking ideas to inspire you!

Fish Tanks & Aquariums | PetSmart

Before he became the manager of Totally Fish, an aquarium store in Aspen Hill, Ken Yuen kept 46 tanks in his home. Few things are more rewarding for a homeowner than combining one of their hobbies or passions with home improvement. If you love fish and marine life, you should install a home aquarium that will help you share this passion with your friends and family. A small rectangular aquarium is fine for your kid’s goldfish, but a custom made aquarium can be as much an investment in your home as it is about having a pet. Different home aquarium designs can accommodate modest budgets or unique, ambitious ideas. Here are some things to consider about putting in a custom aquarium for your home.

Fish Tanks: Saltwater & Freshwater Aquariums & Supplies | Petco

Aquariums are not only for the home setting, but can also be installed at work! It introduces a wide array of benefits not only to employees, but also to visitors and clients too.

Aqueon BettaBow LED Desktop Fish Aquarium Kit


Selecting a fish tank for your home decorating you want to find a functional and energy saving aquarium in a pleasing form. Unusual as well as a custom made aquariums make great home decorations and create stunning centerpieces that enhance modern interior design with original design, small or large size and unique shape. Tropical fish tanks can be round and rectangular, free shaped and oval. Small and large glass fish tanks make spectacular focal point for interior decorating, personalize your home decor and Feng Shui it for wealth.Watch more How to Take Care of an Aquarium videos:



When deciding on what shark to get, you want the best shark for your fish take. It first depends if you have a freshwater tank or a saltwater tank. The sharks that you'll find for freshwater tanks are not true sharks. They're not cartilaginous. They're bony fishes. Their fin patterns and their morphology closely resemble saltwater sharks, so for that reason they're called sharks, but they're not true sharks.

Saltwater is where you'd find the real sharks. For freshwater, most of the shark get very, very large. The iridescent sharks, tricolor sharks, they get really, really big, I mean, three to four feet in nature, but they happen to be very hardy. So you can keep them in a small aquarium, maybe 30 to 50 gallons in size. But they're going to quickly outgrow it, and it's cruel to keep a fish that gets three or four feet in nature restricted to a tank that's only three or four feet long. It's just really, really cruel, so I don't recommend a lot of the freshwater fish that are called sharks for home aquariums. If you have to have a freshwater fish that's called a shark, you can get a redtail shark. They don't get as big. The flying foxes kind of look like sharks. They don't get terribly large.

But for saltwater, the sharks that I would recommend are any of the cat sharks, bamboo, banded cats, dog chain. Those sharks stay on the bottom. Even the epaulettes from Australia, those are really cute sharks. They walk around on their pectoral fins. They also get large, so you want to make sure you have a large aquarium, but because they're not pelagic swimmers like black tips and white tips, any of the open swimming sharks, they're more suitable to home aquariums.

If you have to have something that looks like a great white or a baby great white, like a black tip, you're going to need a really large tank, and those tanks are very expensive. I'm talking, people would recommend a 200 to 300 gallon tank. I wouldn't put them in anything less than 1000 gallons. That tank needs to be round in shape. It needs to be eight to ten feet in diameter. They're just not going to fare well in anything smaller. And the upkeep and the maintenance on an aquarium like that is pretty staggering. You really have to know what you're doing. You need to have a lot of money or be really into this hobby to be that dedicated to keep one these open water reef sharks.

So to wrap it up, for saltwater, I would recommend one of the bottom-dwelling cat sharks. Nurse sharks are really good when they're small, but they get really large, so I don't feel that they're suitable for captivity. And then for freshwater, redtail sharks, tri-colors or balas sharks or iridescent sharks are great when they're small. But again, they're going to get really large and you're going to have to get them a much bigger tank, like the 200 to 300 gallon tank to keep them when they're adults.